History and Social Studies

  • Mashpee High School History and Social Sciences Curriculum

     

    Course Description

     

      

      

    World History II (H, CP)                                                                               1 unit

    The Rise of the Nation State to the Present

    Prerequisite: For Level (H) a B+ or better in World History I or teacher recommendation

    Students study the rise of the nation state in Europe, the French Revolution, and the economic and political roots of the modern world. They study the origins and consequences of the Industrial Revolution, 19th century political reform in Western Europe and imperialism in Africa, Asia, and South America. They will explain the causes and consequences of the great military and economic events of the past century, including World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War and the Russian and Chinese revolutions. Finally, students will study the rise of nationalism and the continuing persistence of political, ethnic and religious conflict in many parts of the world.

    A seminar approach will afford students the opportunity to engage in research and the presentation of data. Students will participate in simulation activities that recreate historical events in order to assess complex historical controversies.

     

    Open to students in grade 9, 10.

    Learning Expectations emphasized: 1, 2, 4

     

    U.S. History I (H, CP)                                                                                    1 unit

    The Revolution through Reconstruction, 1763-1877

    Prerequisite: For Level (H) a B+ or better in previous Level (CP) or C or better in previous Level (H) History class or teacher recommendation

    Students examine the historical and intellectual origins of the United States during the Revolutionary and Constitutional eras. They learn about the important political and economic factors that contributed to the outbreak of the Revolution as well as the consequences of the Revolution, including the writing and key ideas of the U.S. Constitution. Students also study the basic framework of American democracy and the basic concepts of America government such as popular sovereignty, federalism, separation of powers and individual rights. Students study America’s westward expansion, the establishment of political parties and economic and social change. Finally, students will learn about the growth of sectional conflict, how sectional conflict led to the Civil War and the consequences of the Civil War, including Reconstruction.

     

    Open to students in grade 10.

    Learning Expectations emphasized: 1, 2, 4

     

     

    U.S. History II (H, CP)                                                                                   1 unit

    Reconstruction to the Present

    Prerequisite: For Level (H) a B+ or better in previous Level (CP) or C or better in previous Level (H) History class or teacher recommendation

    Students will analyze the causes and consequences of the Industrial Revolution and America’s growing role in diplomatic relations. Students will study the goals and accomplishments of the Progressive movement and the New Deal. Students will also learn about the various factors that led to America’s entry into World War II as well as the consequences of World War II on American life. Finally, students will study the causes and course of the Cold War, important economic and political changes during the Cold War, including the Civil Rights movement, and recent events and trends that have shaped modern-day America.

     

    Open to students in Grade 11.

    Learning Expectations emphasized: 1, 2, 4

     

    Advanced Placement United States History I (AP)                                       1 unit

    Prerequisite: B+ or better in English (CP) and World History II (CP); B or better in English (H) and World History II (H) and the freshman history teacher’s recommendation; or B- or better in AP Human Geography

    This is a demanding college level course offering of the History/Social Sciences Department, and it is presented in accordance with the requirements of the College Board. This is a one year course and is the first half of a two year program that seeks to prepare highly motivated students towards successful completion of the U.S. History Advanced Placement exam in the following academic year. College credit may be extended by participating colleges and universities for successful completion of the courses and the A. P. U. S. History exam. This course is a chronological study of the events, trends and details of American History from 1490 through 1870. It uses the historical method and sharpens critical thinking skills through an analytical approach. Many papers, book reviews and position papers are required. Students will be required to complete a summer reading list and to attend a minimum of two summer seminars at Mashpee High School and to attend some after school review sessions. The A. P. U. S. I course is designed for sophomores; the expectation is that successful students will continue with A. P. U. S. History II the following year, then take the College Board’s A. P. U. S. History exam in May of the junior year.

     

    Open to students in grade 10.

    Learning Expectations emphasized: 1, 2, 4

     

     

    Advanced Placement United States History II (AP)                                     1 unit

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of AP United States History I

    This is a demanding college level course offering of the History/Social Sciences Department, and it is presented in accordance with the requirements of the College Board. This is a one year course that follows successful completion of the A. P. U. S. History I and seeks to prepare highly motivated students toward the U.S. History Advanced Placement exam in their junior year. College credit may be extended by participating colleges and universities for successful completion of this course and the A. P. U. S. History exam. This course is a chronological study of the events, trends and details of American History from 1870 through 2008. It uses the historical method and sharpens critical thinking skills through an analytical approach. Many papers, book reviews and position papers are required. Students will be required to complete a summer reading list and to attend a minimum of two summer seminars at Mashpee High School and to attend some after school review sessions. This course is designed for juniors only and will be available beginning in the 2010-2011 academic year; the expectation is that successful students will take the College Board’s A. P. U. S. History exam in May of the junior year.

     

    Open to students in grade 11 beginning in the 2010-2011 academic year.

    Learning Expectations emphasized: 1, 2, 4

     

    Advanced Placement Human Geography (AP)                                              1 unit

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of World History I and teacher recommendation

    The purpose of this introductory course is to introduce students to the systematic study patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences. Students also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice. This course provides a learning experience equivalent to that obtained in most college introductory human geography courses.

    Learning Expectations emphasized: 1, 2, 4

     

    Advanced Placement European History (AP)                                               1 unit

    Prerequisite: B+ or better in United States History II (CP) or C or better in United States History II (AP, H) or teacher recommendation

    This is a demanding college level course offered in one year and designed for advanced college placement. Students will study European continental history from the 14th century to the present, including political developments and traditions, cultural patterns of living, philosophical ideas and warfare. Students will gain factual knowledge and develop analytical skills necessary for the study of events and problems in European history. In addition to testing, as with all college courses, there is extensive reading, writing and critical analysis. Course is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement European History Exam in May.

     

    Open to students in grades 11 and 12.

    Learning Expectations emphasized: 1, 2, 4

     

    Race and Ethnic Relations (H, CP)                                                                ½ unit

    This semester long course will cover the ways in which races and ethnicities have interacted in U.S. History. The course will discuss the concepts of race and ethnicity through sociological and historical studies. The course will cover many races including African American, Native American, Asian, Hispanic and many more. The course will emphasize the Wampanoag culture, Mashpee’s One-Room Schoolhouse, Otis ANG Base, and other aspects unique of Mashpee. Students will be expected to participate in group debates as well as individual projects.

     

    Open to students in grades 10, 11 and 12.

    Learning Expectations emphasized: 1, 2, 4

     

    Sociology (CP)                                                                                                ½ unit

    Sociology is the study of contemporary people and their civilizations. Topics include the family, racial and ethnic minorities, crime and delinquency, and the study of social and political influences.

     

    Open to students in grades 10, 11 and 12.

    Learning Expectations emphasized: 1, 2, 4

     

    Law and the Legal System (CP)                                                                    ½ unit

    This course is designed to provide students with a practical understanding of the law and the legal system with special emphasis on the roles that law, lawyers, law enforcement officers and the legal system play in our society.

    This course will promote in students a willingness and capability to participate effectively in the legal and political systems. In other words, students will become thoughtful, active citizens with the ability to analyze, evaluate, and in some situations, resolve legal disputes.

     

    Open to students in grades 10, 11 and 12.

    Learning Expectations emphasized: 1, 2, 4

     

    Law and the Legal System II (CP)                                                                 ½ unit

    Prerequisite: Students enrolling in Law and the Legal System II must have completed Law and the Legal System I and must have earned a B (85%) or higher and/or be recommended by the teacher

    This course is intended for highly motivated college-bound juniors and seniors interested in pursuing a career in law, or law enforcement. Students in this course are required to have excellent reading comprehension and writing skills. The course will examine the structure, operation, and constitutional protections of the U.S. legal system. Students will study the role played by the judicial branch in the creation of case law in areas such as search and seizure, interrogations, freedom of speech, freedom of religion, and equal protection under the law. Students will also participate in field trips and have the opportunity to learn from visiting professionals in various law-related fields. Written and oral case reports will be assigned at the discretion of the instructor. The class will culminate with the Mock Trial Process.

     

    Open to students in grades 11 and 12

    Learning Expectations emphasized: 1, 2, 4

     

     

    American Government (H, CP)                                                                     ½ unit

    Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation required for honors placement

    Massachusetts State Frameworks will guide this curriculum. An eye-opening look at our Tradition of Democracy will commence this course. Students will explore what “We The People” really means as we review The Foundations of Government, The U.S. Constitution, and our Rights and Responsibilities as Americans. The second unit of study will focus on The Federal Government; The Legislative Branch, The Executive Branch, and The Judicial Branch. State and Local Government will then be studied. The role that the citizen plays in government, as well as in society, will conclude this half year course.

     

    Open to students in grades 11 and 12.

    Learning Expectations emphasized: 1, 2, 4

     

    Psychology I (H, CP)                                                                                      ½ unit

    Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation required for Level (H) placement

    This course presents a broad overview of the study of human behavior and mental thought processes. Topics include (but are not limited to) the following: The Mind at Work; The Study of Human Behavior, Consciousness, and The Brian and Behavior. How People Grow; The Child Grows Up, and The Adolescent Searches For Identity. Personality Development; Freud’s Theory of Personality, and Personality Theory Since Freud.

    This is a discussion driven course that provides ample opportunity for student participation in demonstrations, activities, experiments and small group learning. Students taking this course at Level 3 will be required to fulfill additional course requirements.

     

    Open to students in grade 11 and 12.

    Learning Expectations emphasized

     

    Psychology II (H, CP)                                                                                                ½ unit

    Prerequisite: Successful of Completion of Psychology I. Teacher recommendation required for Level (H) placement

    This course presents a broad overview of the study of human behavior and mental thought processes. Topics include (but are not limited to) the following: When Personality is Disturbed, Understanding the Troubled Personality, Helping Troubled Personality, How People Learn, Learning, Thinking and Developing Creativity, Psychology Testing, The Individual and Society, Behavior in Groups, Sex Roles, Sexism and Sexuality, New Directions in Psychology; Exploring Unknown Worlds, Searching for New Ways to Grow, Strategies for Coping.

    This is a discussion driven course that provides ample opportunity for student participation in demonstrations, activities, experiments and small group learning. Students taking this course at Level 3 will be required to fulfill additional course requirements.

     

    Open to students in grade 11 and 12.

    Learning Expectations emphasized: 1, 2, 4

     

    Economics (H, CP)                                                                                         ½ unit

    This course may be taken for History and Social Studies or Applied Arts credit.

    One of the primary goals of Economics is to explain to students the role that economics plays in improving the quality of their decision-making process. This course brings together a variety of learning tools to help the student not only learn about economics, but also appreciate the importance of economics in his/her personal life as well as in the functioning of our domestic and global economies. The student can expect that in this millennium, people throughout the world will be faced with more decisions that have important economic components. Level 3 students will be required to fulfill additional course requirements.

     

    Open to students in grades 11 and 12.

    Learning Expectations emphasized: 1, 2, 4

     

    Since JFK (H, CP)                                                                                          ½ unit

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of United States History

    Since JFK is constructed as a "capstone" frameworks course for college bound seniors. The curriculum will be 50% student-directed and 50% teacher-directed. Students will have opportunities to pursue their own interests on topics since the onset of the Cold War. The class will be centered on lectures, debates and simulations culminating in individual and groups projects. There will be no textbook, rather, this course will be built around novels, primary and secondary source material and student research. Students will develop the traditional research skills necessary for college. Portfolios and other alternative forms of assessment will be utilized. Level 3 students will be required to fulfill additional course requirements.

     

    Open to students in grade 12.

    Learning Expectations emphasized: 1, 2, 4

     

     

     

    Sports in Society (H)                                                                                      ½ unit

    Sociology of Sport and Physical Activity is an examination of the social relations within the institution of sport and its role in the reproduction and transformation of society. Topics include socialization, stratification, gender relations, race and ethnicity and social change. History of Sport and Physical Activity is a survey of the history of modern sport and other forms of organized physical activity. Emphasis is placed on the struggles of women, people of color, and athletes to gain access and control of organized sport in the United States.

     

    Open to students in grades 11 and 12.

    Learning Expectations emphasized: 1, 2, 4

     

    Women’s Studies (CP)                                                                                   ½ unit

    Placing women’s experiences at the center of interpretation, this class introduces basic concepts and key areas of women’s lives both historically and contemporaneously. It is an inter-disciplinary, trans-disciplinary, and cross cultural study of women’s roles and relations but it is also an overview of theoretical perspectives on gender and its intersection with other social constructs of difference (race/ethnicity, class, sexuality, and age). The central aim is to foster critical reading and thinking about these interlocking systems which have shaped and influenced the historical, cultural, social, political, and economical contexts of our lives. Special attention will be given to women’s resistance of those gendered inequalities, and the various ways they have worked to create new systems of change by engaging in national and global transformational politics.

     

    Learning Expectations emphasized: 1, 2, 4

     

    Comparative Politics (CP)                                                                              ½ unit

    This course offers an introductory exploration of political systems in several nation states in various parts of the world. Coverage differs depending on the specialties and interests of instructor. Students learn about generalized comparative approaches and political development, political processes and political institutions in each state covered.

     

    Learning Expectations emphasized: 1, 2, 4